Difference between revisions of "Tropico"

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The native Taíno people had inhabited Hispaniola since the 7th century, dividing it into five chiefdoms.[3] Christopher Columbus was the first European to see the island, landing here on December 5, 1492.[3] The colony of Santo Domingo became the site of the first permanent European settlement in the Americas, the oldest continuously inhabited city, and the first seat of the Spanish colonial rule in the New World. Shortly after the appointment of the new Governor, the settlement experienced a sudden productive, population, infrastructural, cultural and societal boom on the few following years prior to it developing its own national identity and finally proclaiming its independence from Spain. The independence of Tropico allows its governor to become their first president, solidifying the establishment of a dynasty that continues to influence the country to this day.
 
The native Taíno people had inhabited Hispaniola since the 7th century, dividing it into five chiefdoms.[3] Christopher Columbus was the first European to see the island, landing here on December 5, 1492.[3] The colony of Santo Domingo became the site of the first permanent European settlement in the Americas, the oldest continuously inhabited city, and the first seat of the Spanish colonial rule in the New World. Shortly after the appointment of the new Governor, the settlement experienced a sudden productive, population, infrastructural, cultural and societal boom on the few following years prior to it developing its own national identity and finally proclaiming its independence from Spain. The independence of Tropico allows its governor to become their first president, solidifying the establishment of a dynasty that continues to influence the country to this day.
  
Tropico has the ninth-largest economy in Latin America and is the largest economy in the Caribbean and Central American region. Over the two decades to 2012, Tropico has had one of the fastest-growing economies in the Americas – with an average real GDP growth rate of 5.4% between 1996 and 2014. GDP growth in 2014 and 2015 reached 7.3 and 7.0%, respectively, the highest in the Western Hemisphere. In the first half of 2016 the Dominican economy grew 7.4% continuing its trend of rapid economic growth. Recent growth has been driven by construction, manufacturing, tourism, and mining. The country is the site of the second largest gold mine in the world, the Pueblo Viejo mine. Private consumption has been strong, as a result of low inflation (under 1% on average in 2015), job creation, and a high level of remittances.
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Tropico has the ninth-largest economy in Latin America and is the largest economy in the Caribbean and Central American region. Over the two decades to 2012, Tropico has had one of the fastest-growing economies in the Americas – with an average real GDP growth rate of 5.4% between 1996 and 2014. GDP growth in 2014 and 2015 reached 7.3 and 7.0%, respectively, the highest in the Western Hemisphere. In the first half of 2016 the Tropican economy grew 7.4% continuing its trend of rapid economic growth. Recent growth has been driven by construction, manufacturing, tourism, and mining. The country is the site of the second largest gold mine in the world, the Pueblo Viejo mine. Private consumption has been strong, as a result of low inflation (under 1% on average in 2015), job creation, and a high level of remittances.

Revision as of 00:36, 5 December 2019

Tropico (Spanish:Trópico), officailly called The Republic of Tropico(Spanish:República de Trópico), is a federal presidential constitutional republic in the Caribbean Sea. It is bordered on the north by OTHER-NATION, on the south by OTHER-NATION, by the east by OTHER-NATION and on the west by OTHER-NATION. NATION covers LAND AREA square kilometers and has has an estimated population of 7,697,253 people. Tropico comprises of 12 provinces.

Republic of Tropico

República de Trópico
Vertical tricolor (green, red, yellow) with a five-pointed gold star in the center of the red.
Flag
{{{coat_alt}}}
Coat of arms
Motto: 
"Viva la Trópico" (Spanish)
"Long Live Tropico"
Anthem: 
"[[]] (Spanish)"
Hey, Enemy a
Location of Cameroon on the globe.
CapitalPuetro Isabella
blank
Largest cityPuerto Teresa
Official languagesSpanish, English
Ethnic groups
  • 50% Mestizos
  • 20% Xerdans
  • 10% Native Americans
  • 10% Europeans
  • 5% Africans
  • 5% Others
Demonym(s)Tropican
GovernmentFederal parliamentary constitutional republic
• President
Mauricio Amengual
Cristóbal Fernandino
Benito Carvallo
LegislatureNational Assembly
Independence from the Spain
• Declared
15 May 1850
• Annexation of former
British Cameroons
1 October 1961
Area
• Total
475,442 km2 (183,569 sq mi) (54th)
• Water (%)
1.3
Population
• July 2012 estimate
7,697,253 (58th)
• 2016 census
7,697,253
• Density
39.7/km2 (102.8/sq mi) (167th)
GDP (PPP)2011 estimate
• Total
$47.251 billion
• Per capita
$28,257
GDP (nominal)2011 estimate
• Total
$25.759 billion
• Per capita
$1,230
Gini (2001)44.6
medium
HDI (2011)Increase 0.802
very high · 20th
CurrencyTropican peso (XAF)
Time zoneUTC+1 (WAT)
• Summer (DST)
not observed
Driving sideright
Calling code-65
Internet TLD.kur
  1. These are the titles as given in the Constitution of the Republic of Cameroon, Article X. The French version of the song is sometimes called Chant de Ralliement, as in National Anthems of the World; and the English version "O Cameroon, Cradle of Our Forefathers", as in DeLancey and DeLancey 61.

The native Taíno people had inhabited Hispaniola since the 7th century, dividing it into five chiefdoms.[3] Christopher Columbus was the first European to see the island, landing here on December 5, 1492.[3] The colony of Santo Domingo became the site of the first permanent European settlement in the Americas, the oldest continuously inhabited city, and the first seat of the Spanish colonial rule in the New World. Shortly after the appointment of the new Governor, the settlement experienced a sudden productive, population, infrastructural, cultural and societal boom on the few following years prior to it developing its own national identity and finally proclaiming its independence from Spain. The independence of Tropico allows its governor to become their first president, solidifying the establishment of a dynasty that continues to influence the country to this day.

Tropico has the ninth-largest economy in Latin America and is the largest economy in the Caribbean and Central American region. Over the two decades to 2012, Tropico has had one of the fastest-growing economies in the Americas – with an average real GDP growth rate of 5.4% between 1996 and 2014. GDP growth in 2014 and 2015 reached 7.3 and 7.0%, respectively, the highest in the Western Hemisphere. In the first half of 2016 the Tropican economy grew 7.4% continuing its trend of rapid economic growth. Recent growth has been driven by construction, manufacturing, tourism, and mining. The country is the site of the second largest gold mine in the world, the Pueblo Viejo mine. Private consumption has been strong, as a result of low inflation (under 1% on average in 2015), job creation, and a high level of remittances.