Difference between revisions of "Vvarden"

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'''Vvarden''', officially called the ... ([[Vvardenese]]: ''...''), or also known as the ..., is a ... on the continent of [[Asura]] located within [[Aeia]]. The official language is Vvardenese, which is spoken by approximately 80 million people worldwide.
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'''Vvarden''', officially called the ... ([[Vvardenese]]: ''...''), or also known as the ..., is a ... on the continent of [[Asura]] located within [[Aeia]]. The official languages are Callae and Lugonian, which is spoken by approximately 80 million people worldwide.
  
 
Modern humans first arrived in the Vvarden around 35,000 years ago, and developed neolithic cultures. Sifharo-Asuran Foranic cultures, arrived in the region around the 6th or 5th century BCE, along with ancient ... and ... settlements. Vvarden began to be under Fiorentine rule around 180 BCE. Fiorentine rule was centred along the west coast near large iron deposits and trading ports, and Vvarden was not fully conquered until the end of the first century AD. Previous military expeditions to subdue the east Foranic tribes in the mountains, such as those of Marcus Cornelius Gallicanus, and Aelius Magnus, had mostly ended in failure, making the Fiorentines content to hold onto the western half of the country. As such, there was not a lot of expansion of Fiorentine cultural influence further inland for at least some time, forming the beginning of Vvarden's modern day cultural divide. From AD 47, three years after the ascension of Nero, grandnephew of Gaius Claudius Caesar Augustus, the eastern half was slowly conquered, with the Fiorentines settling many colonies, most notably Colonia Victricensis with its large Temple of Nero, the largest of its type in the eastern half of the country. The conquest was finally completed by AD 96, but even then there remained loose pockets of resistance and some rebellions, particularly in the highlands.
 
Modern humans first arrived in the Vvarden around 35,000 years ago, and developed neolithic cultures. Sifharo-Asuran Foranic cultures, arrived in the region around the 6th or 5th century BCE, along with ancient ... and ... settlements. Vvarden began to be under Fiorentine rule around 180 BCE. Fiorentine rule was centred along the west coast near large iron deposits and trading ports, and Vvarden was not fully conquered until the end of the first century AD. Previous military expeditions to subdue the east Foranic tribes in the mountains, such as those of Marcus Cornelius Gallicanus, and Aelius Magnus, had mostly ended in failure, making the Fiorentines content to hold onto the western half of the country. As such, there was not a lot of expansion of Fiorentine cultural influence further inland for at least some time, forming the beginning of Vvarden's modern day cultural divide. From AD 47, three years after the ascension of Nero, grandnephew of Gaius Claudius Caesar Augustus, the eastern half was slowly conquered, with the Fiorentines settling many colonies, most notably Colonia Victricensis with its large Temple of Nero, the largest of its type in the eastern half of the country. The conquest was finally completed by AD 96, but even then there remained loose pockets of resistance and some rebellions, particularly in the highlands.
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===Prehistory===
 
===Prehistory===
  
Vvarden was inhabited, first by ''Homo erectus'', then by Homo Glenmorensis. Archaeological findings from cavs in the Cerbantian mountains reveal that Vvarden was populated by hominids at least some 1 million years ago. Modern day humans are believed to have arrived from the east around 36,000 years ago, leaving behind cultural items such as cave paintings like those in ... . Vvarden is believed to have been one of the major refuges for early human populations within Asura during the ice age, and findings show the area was relatively populated and lively. In the Mesolithic period, a native culture developed, that of the ..., and later, with the introduction of the Bronze Age, megaliths and tumuli were constructed. In the Iron Age, the territory came under the cultural influence of the ...; the local Foranic peoples, known as the ..., were composed of tribes such as the Luggones, the Pesicos, and others, who populated the entire area with castros (fortified hill-towns).
+
Vvarden was inhabited, first by ''Homo erectus'', then by Homo Glenmorensis. Archaeological findings from cavs in the Cerbantian mountains reveal that Vvarden was populated by hominids at least some 1 million years ago. Modern day humans are believed to have arrived from the east around 36,000 years ago, leaving behind cultural items such as cave paintings like those in ... . Vvarden is believed to have been one of the major refuges for early human populations within Asura during the ice age, and findings show the area was relatively populated and lively. In the Mesolithic period, a native culture developed, that of the ..., and later, with the introduction of the Bronze Age, megaliths and tumuli were constructed. In the Iron Age, the territory came under the cultural influence of the Foranics; the local Foranic peoples, known as the Callaecians, were composed of tribes such as the Luggones, the Pesicos, and others, who populated the entire area with fortified hill-towns.
 
 
====Pre-Fiorentine Period====
 
  
 
===Fiorentine Vvarden===
 
===Fiorentine Vvarden===
 
[[image:Fiorentina map.png|thumb|right|260px|Map of the Fiorentine Empire at its greatest extent in 80 CE]]
 
[[image:Fiorentina map.png|thumb|right|260px|Map of the Fiorentine Empire at its greatest extent in 80 CE]]
  
Vvarden was ultimately completely conquered by the Fiorentines over a period of two hundred years, and managed to continue control of it for another six hundred, bringing Fiorentine influence. This influence had a profound impact on the cultural and linguistic nature of Vvarden. The west became densely populated with Fiorentine speakers, assimilating the native ..., unlike the more rustic and sporadically controlled centre and east, controlled by the ... . This enabled the ... language to survive and evolve into modern ..., albeit not without significant influence. Fiorentine rule was cemented through constructs such as roads, and bindings such as their laws. For most of the Fiorentine period, Vvarden acted as a granary for the empire, exporting olives, wool, gold, iron, lead, and wine across the empire. Agricultural yield boomed thanks to irrigation projects, like aqueducts, which still remain today in many parts of Vvarden. The Fiorentine Emperors ..., ..., ..., Lugonicus, and ... were born in Vvarden, along with the noted philosopher ... . Vvarden converted to Alydianism after missionaries came in around the 2nd century, quickly becoming popular. These Fiorentine and ... influences went on to define much of Vvarden's later laws, languages, and its religions.
+
Vvarden was ultimately completely conquered by the Fiorentines over a period of two hundred years, and managed to continue control of it for another six hundred, bringing Fiorentine influence. This influence had a profound impact on the cultural and linguistic nature of Vvarden. The west became densely populated with Fiorentine speakers, assimilating the native Foranics, unlike the more rustic and sporadically controlled centre and east, controlled by the Callaecians. This enabled the Callaecian language to survive and evolve into modern Callae, albeit not without significant influence. Fiorentine rule was cemented through constructs such as roads, and bindings such as their laws. For most of the Fiorentine period, Vvarden acted as a granary for the empire, exporting olives, wool, gold, iron, lead, and wine across the empire. Agricultural yield boomed thanks to irrigation projects, like aqueducts, which still remain today in many parts of Vvarden. The Fiorentine Emperors ..., ..., ..., Lugonicus, and ... were born in Vvarden, along with the noted philosopher ... . Vvarden converted to Alydianism after missionaries came in around the 2nd century, quickly becoming popular. These Fiorentine and Callaecian influences went on to define much of Vvarden's later laws, languages, and its religions.
  
====Post-Fiorentine Vvarden and the Kingdom of the Gautigoths====
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===Post-Fiorentine Vvarden and the Kingdom of the Gautigoths====
''Main articles: [[History of the Gautigothic Kingdom]], and [[Amaling dynasty]]''
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''Main articles: [[History of the Gautigothic Kingdom]], [[Syagrii dynasty]], and [[Amaling dynasty]]''
  
 
[[File:Muralla.Lugo.Galicia.jpg|thumb|right|260px|The Fiorentine Walls of [[Sant'Eremo]]]]
 
[[File:Muralla.Lugo.Galicia.jpg|thumb|right|260px|The Fiorentine Walls of [[Sant'Eremo]]]]
In 399, Gautigothic tribes had entered Vvarden, looking for lands to settle and raid. Although the Fiorentine Empire began to disintegrate in the 4th century, leading to the abandonment of Vvarden by Emperor Sebastianus in 422, many of the successor regimes in Vvarden maintained many of the institutions and laws of the late empire. During the fall of the Fiorentine Empire, pirates from Wradhia and Cuirpthe began to raid the coast of Vvarden, and were followed in three centuries by Lhedwinic raiders. Some of the most prominent cities of Fiorentinized coastal Vvarden, having been disconnected from the Fiorentines since the abandonment of the province in 422, formed judicates and banded together to resist invaders. Among the most notable of these judicates was Aeminium (modern Conibria), ruled by the Syagrii family, who continued to style themselves as Dominates of the Fiorentine Empire. The Syagrii family eventually united these judicates, forming a briefly successful post-Fiorentine state in Vvarden. While officially calling themselves the rulers of the Fiorentine Empire, they also called themselves the Dukes of Lugonia, or ''Dux Lugoniae''.
+
In 399, Gautigothic tribes had entered Vvarden, looking for lands to settle and raid. Although the Fiorentine Empire began to disintegrate in the 4th century, leading to the abandonment of Vvarden by Emperor Sebastianus in 422, many of the successor regimes in Vvarden maintained many of the institutions and laws of the late empire. During the fall of the Fiorentine Empire, pirates from Wradhia and Cuirpthe began to raid the coast of Vvarden, and were followed in three centuries by Lhedwinic raiders. Some of the most prominent cities of Fiorentinized coastal Vvarden, having been disconnected from the Fiorentines since the abandonment of the province in 422, formed judicates (''judicati'') and banded together to resist invaders. Among the most notable of these judicates was Aeminium (near modern Conibria), ruled by the Syagrii family, who continued to style themselves as Dominates of the Fiorentine Empire. The Syagrii family eventually united these judicates, forming a briefly successful post-Fiorentine state in Vvarden. While officially calling themselves the rulers of the Fiorentine Empire, they also called themselves the Dukes of Lugonia, or ''Dux Lugoniae'', and were elected from candidates in the family by a council of nobles. Up until their conquest at the hands of the Gautigoths in 524, the Dukes of Lugonia are seen as by many as the "[[Betrayal at Mydroll|the last of the Fiorentines]]."
  
Other notable states of the post-Fiorentine includes the Fiorento-Foranic kingdom of ..., which became a source of many legends and stories in the Middle Ages, such as the ... Cycle, based on the legendary King ... . In this time, Callaea was in the hands of several Fiorento-Foranic states in what was called the "Old East" or Sé Tusto. These states included Morodon, Temro, Breganto, and Daro. Many of these Post-Fiorentine Callaean states labelled themselves as kings and princes of their dynasties, and it is in this time that clans such as the Au Verdorci, Au Briagoi, Au Cunocobri, Au Arcadi, and Au Bailai emerge.  
+
Other notable states of post-Fiorentine Vvarden includes part of the Fiorento-Foranic kingdom of ..., which became a source of many legends and stories in the Middle Ages, such as the ... Cycle, based on the legendary King ... . In this time, Callaea was in the hands of several Fiorento-Foranic states in what was called the "Old East" or Sé Tusto. These states included Morodon, Temro, Breganto, and Daro. Many of these Post-Fiorentine Callaean states labelled themselves as dukes and princes of their dynasties rather than basing themselves off of geographical elements like the Callaecians, and it is in this time that clans such as the Au Verdorci, Au Briagoi, Au Cunocobri, Au Arcadi, and Au Bailai emerge. Many tribes would fight over the title of High King, although only a few succeeded to unite most of these clans.  
  
 
[[image:Beaux-Arts_de_Carcassonne_-_Le_dernier_des_M%C3%A9rovingiens_-_Evariste-Vital_Luminais_-Joconde_04400000403.jpg|thumb|250px|left| The Last of Amal's Heirs, a painting by Agimer-Rre de Forssu depicting the tonsuring of Gandolfo Amaling]]
 
[[image:Beaux-Arts_de_Carcassonne_-_Le_dernier_des_M%C3%A9rovingiens_-_Evariste-Vital_Luminais_-Joconde_04400000403.jpg|thumb|250px|left| The Last of Amal's Heirs, a painting by Agimer-Rre de Forssu depicting the tonsuring of Gandolfo Amaling]]
The peninsula was eventually united by the Amaling dynasty of the Gautigoths in 463 under King Leoverto, creating the Amalic Kingdom. Leoverto was also the first king to give written laws to the Gautigoths. His successors assumed the role of protectors of the ...-Fiorentine rites of the Alydianist Church, against Foranic Alydianism in the north, and in these devastating wars many of the Amaling kings, such as Leoverto's sons Leodo I and Leodomiro I, were killed. Atanaxildo's descendant, Teodegildo III, who led armies to conquer Foranic lands and pagans in the east, is commonly seen as the last powerful Amaling King. In 820, upon the death of High King Xuntomiro, his lands were divided between his sons Xaudemiro and Xelimiro. Over the next few decades, Gautigothic lands shrank to foreign conquests and rebelling nobles until it was reduced to a rump state in western Vvarden. In 851, the Mayor of the Palace, Vermudo deposed the last member of the Amaling dynasty, Gandolfo Amaling, tonsuring him and exiling him to a monastery, ending over three hundred years of Gautigothic rule. With the support of the remaining nobility and the blessing of the Pontiff of Laterna, Vermudo became the first King of Lugonia.
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Most of Vvarden was eventually united by the Amaling dynasty of the Gautigoths in 524 under King Leoverto, creating the Amalic or Gautigothic Kingdom. Leoverto was also the first king to give written laws to the Gautigoths. His successors assumed the role of protectors of the Fiorentine rites of the Alydianist Church, against Foranic Alydianism in the north, and in these devastating wars many of the Amaling kings, such as Leoverto's sons Leodo I and Leodomiro I, were killed. Atanaxildo's descendant, Tedegildo III, who led armies to conquer Foranic lands and pagans in the east, is commonly seen as the last powerful Amaling King. In 820, upon the death of High King Xuntomiro, his lands were divided between his sons Xaudemiro and Xelimiro. Over the next few decades, Gautigothic lands shrank to foreign conquests and rebelling nobles until it was reduced to a rump state in western Vvarden. In 851, the Mayor of the Palace, Vermudo deposed the last member of the Amaling dynasty, Gandolfo Amaling, tonsuring him and exiling him to a monastery, ending over three hundred years of Gautigothic rule. With the support of the remaining nobility and the blessing of the Pontiff of Laterna, Vermudo became the first King of Lugonia (''Rex Lugoniae'').
  
 
===Middle Ages===
 
===Middle Ages===
[[File:Iglesia de Santa María del Naranco.jpg|thumb|250px|right|Santa Siana au Tavo, ancient palace of the Kings of Lugonia, built in 839 AD. Many churches of Vvarden are among the oldest churches of Asura since Early Middle Ages.]]
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[[File:Iglesia de Santa María del Naranco.jpg|thumb|250px|right|Santa Siana di Tavo, ancient palace of the Kings of Lugonia, built in 839 AD. Many churches of Vvarden are among the oldest churches of Asura since the Early Middle Ages.]]
  
In the east, following the example of Gundemaro Mires, Lugonian noble Doncado MacoBriago de Carantos, also known as Doncado Dono or Doncado the Brown, was able to seize several towns in the hilly and mountainous area of ..., crowning himself King of ... in 840. Doncado was a member of a clan who traced themselves back to a legendary Fiorentine noble by the name of Arcado Dubo who remained in Vvarden and resisted the Gautigoths.
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In the east, following the example of Vermudo, Lugonian noble Doncado MacoBriago au Carantos, also known as Doncado Dono or Doncado the Brown, was able to seize several towns in the hilly and mountainous area of eastern Vvarden, crowning himself King of Callacia in 852. Doncado was a member of a clan who traced themselves back to a legendary Fiorentine noble by the name of Arcado Dubo who remained in Vvarden and resisted the Gautigoths.
  
 
Around the turn of the 10th century, names from purely ... origins like Vedorcu or Daucale or Malcunu became less common among the ruling classes, replaced by names that had either Gautigoth or Fiorentine origins like Ricmeru, Alfonsu, Remanu, and Vernandu. The name change reflects the increasingly changing nature of Vvarden entering the High Medieval Period, as influences from nearby Fiorentine-culture slowly replaced many aspects of traditional ... culture.  
 
Around the turn of the 10th century, names from purely ... origins like Vedorcu or Daucale or Malcunu became less common among the ruling classes, replaced by names that had either Gautigoth or Fiorentine origins like Ricmeru, Alfonsu, Remanu, and Vernandu. The name change reflects the increasingly changing nature of Vvarden entering the High Medieval Period, as influences from nearby Fiorentine-culture slowly replaced many aspects of traditional ... culture.  
  
 +
(WIP)
 
The situation in Vvarden became increasingly complex and divisive by the time of the arrival of the Normaunds in the early 11th century. In 1007, Normaund pilgrims started travelling to Vvarden. They travelled in order to pay homage at certain holy sites, such as the Temple of St. Landus at Carnu, and the Monastery of St. Dimas on Monte Vindu. Others travelled to Vvarden as mercenaries, led by brothers Robert and Enguerrand de Brai, descendants of the legendary Boso de Brai. The brothers so distinguished themselves in service to Lugonia in the War of Brigantia that King Nepoxano gave them the frontier counties of Esarno, Eiras, Brega and Tirtocu in 1012. King Nepoxano had hoped to appease the issue of Normaund immigration into Vvarden by giving them a rural, impoverished, area to settle in, one devastated by recent wars. Nepoxano also hoped that the Normaunds could also act as a buffer when Celts would regain their strength and raid Lugonia. Contrary to his expectations, Robert, Enguerrand, and a third brother Raymond/Rreamun, who travelled to join them in 1013, were able to rebuild and fortify the area using advanced construction techniques picked up in their time in Mydroll, fortifying the land with many castles. The Brothers de Brai as they became known, quickly established themselves as powerful vassals of King Nepoxano, able to influence Lugonian politics to a large degree.  
 
The situation in Vvarden became increasingly complex and divisive by the time of the arrival of the Normaunds in the early 11th century. In 1007, Normaund pilgrims started travelling to Vvarden. They travelled in order to pay homage at certain holy sites, such as the Temple of St. Landus at Carnu, and the Monastery of St. Dimas on Monte Vindu. Others travelled to Vvarden as mercenaries, led by brothers Robert and Enguerrand de Brai, descendants of the legendary Boso de Brai. The brothers so distinguished themselves in service to Lugonia in the War of Brigantia that King Nepoxano gave them the frontier counties of Esarno, Eiras, Brega and Tirtocu in 1012. King Nepoxano had hoped to appease the issue of Normaund immigration into Vvarden by giving them a rural, impoverished, area to settle in, one devastated by recent wars. Nepoxano also hoped that the Normaunds could also act as a buffer when Celts would regain their strength and raid Lugonia. Contrary to his expectations, Robert, Enguerrand, and a third brother Raymond/Rreamun, who travelled to join them in 1013, were able to rebuild and fortify the area using advanced construction techniques picked up in their time in Mydroll, fortifying the land with many castles. The Brothers de Brai as they became known, quickly established themselves as powerful vassals of King Nepoxano, able to influence Lugonian politics to a large degree.  
  

Revision as of 08:08, 15 February 2020

Kingdom of Vvarden

...
Flag of Vvarden
Flag
{{{coat_alt}}}
Coat of arms
Motto: Hoc hic misterium fidei firmiter profitemur
"Here is the mystery of faith that we strongly profess"
Anthem: 
Gaibez á bri verde, Oh bailo au Iogan
("Bound by green hill forts, O hearth of Iogan")
MediaPlayer.png
Official languagesLugonian, Callae
Demonym(s)Vvardenese
Government
• President
Amaro Piras
• Prime Minister
Iagu Trudu
Establishment
• Subjugation of local Veyene and Celtic peoples by the Fiorentine Empire
50-60 B.C
• Gautigothic Kingdom established
523 C.E
851 C.E
• Floriana and Lustainu
1214 C.E
• Union of Portucaria and Lugonia
1444 C.E
• Loisine War
1802 C.E
1895 C.E
1923 C.E
1934 C.E
1989 C.E
Population
• Estimate
32,000,000
• 2018 census
31,812,420
CurrencyVvardenese Rial (VR)
Date formatdd ˘ mm ˘ yyyy
Driving sideleft
Internet TLD.vvr

Vvarden, officially called the ... (Vvardenese: ...), or also known as the ..., is a ... on the continent of Asura located within Aeia. The official languages are Callae and Lugonian, which is spoken by approximately 80 million people worldwide.

Modern humans first arrived in the Vvarden around 35,000 years ago, and developed neolithic cultures. Sifharo-Asuran Foranic cultures, arrived in the region around the 6th or 5th century BCE, along with ancient ... and ... settlements. Vvarden began to be under Fiorentine rule around 180 BCE. Fiorentine rule was centred along the west coast near large iron deposits and trading ports, and Vvarden was not fully conquered until the end of the first century AD. Previous military expeditions to subdue the east Foranic tribes in the mountains, such as those of Marcus Cornelius Gallicanus, and Aelius Magnus, had mostly ended in failure, making the Fiorentines content to hold onto the western half of the country. As such, there was not a lot of expansion of Fiorentine cultural influence further inland for at least some time, forming the beginning of Vvarden's modern day cultural divide. From AD 47, three years after the ascension of Nero, grandnephew of Gaius Claudius Caesar Augustus, the eastern half was slowly conquered, with the Fiorentines settling many colonies, most notably Colonia Victricensis with its large Temple of Nero, the largest of its type in the eastern half of the country. The conquest was finally completed by AD 96, but even then there remained loose pockets of resistance and some rebellions, particularly in the highlands.

At the beginning of the fifth century, the Fiorentine Empire led by Sebastianus abandoned the province in response to the increasing threat faced by eastern Germanic migrations. These Vvardenese cities, which were told to organise their own defences from resurgent Marric invaders sweeping south, as well as from invading Germanic groups, began to fragment among tribal lines, becoming separate kingdoms in their own right. Germanic groups, like those of the Gautigoths and Taifals, invaded and managed to unite a majority of Vvarden by the 7th century under the Amalic Kingdom, but were quickly assimilated into the local Fioreno-Marric population. Over the next few hundred years, the ethnic distinction between the indigenous population and the Germanic invaders had mostly dissipated; the Gautigoth language consigned to the declining function of a church language at the time of the abolishment of different laws for Allamanic and Vardene peoples in 654. The nobility of the Amalic Kingdom, in particular the Mayors of the Palace, slowly gained power from the monarchy and from one another, turning them into little more than figureheads. Eventually the reign of the Amalic dynasty came to an end when one of the Mayors of the Palace, Vermudo de Lugones, removed the figurehead King Gandolfo, establishing the Kingdom of Lugonia. By the year 1300, most of Vvarden's kingdoms had been united into two entities, the Kingdom of Lugonia, and the Kingdom of ... . These two kingdoms were unified themselves in the Pact of Wernimes-Ogrobis in 1511, which formed a marriage between Eremand III of Lugonia and Juana of ... . Upon their death, the throne passed to their only surviving son, Sarles I, who formed the United Kingdom of Vvarden.

During the 18th and 19th century, Vvarden underwent a number of stresses, such as wars of succession, ethnic strife, clashings between conservative and liberal tendencies, and the decline of its colonial empire. In 1909, shortly after the ending of the Great War, Vvarden became a republic. This First Republic was unstable, and monarchist sympathies remained strong, resulting in the failed August Coup of 1912. A civil war in 1932 ended with the formation of the anarcho-syndicalist ... People's Federation. This Federation joined the forces of the ... in the Second Great War, resulting in their defeat in the 1940s. In the 1950s, after the destructive Second Great War, there was a political reshuffling in the new Second Republic of Vvarden that led to the elections of social democratic and mostly market liberal presidents such as Joan-Pol Cuba, Francus MacoDaucale, and Mircadu Carinotin. Due to political crises in the late 1950s, the Second Republic of Vvarden was reformed into the Vvardenese Republic in 1960 under Ramon Ovalle, creating a presidential system. The 1960s, 1970s and 1980s were marked by unprecedented economic growth, especially under Presidents Larenntu Melis and Brigida Sandias, of which the strong directive role of the state during the 60s and 70s is said to be responsible. Since the 1940s, Vvarden has become a secondary power in Asura both economically and politically.

Vvarden has left a profound cultural and architectural influence across the globe and a legacy of ... million Vvardenese speakers, especially in former colonies and current possessions of Vvarden, from which many Vvardenese-based creoles exist.


Etymology

The origin of the term "Vvarden" is highly debated. Some have stated that it originates in proto-Foranic artodunom, meaning "Bear-Fort", which became corrupted with the Gautigoths into Waradun, which became "Varden". Other scholars of the proto-Foranic origin for Vvarden's name have instead proposed wailodun meaning "Wolf-Fort" as the origin. There are those who believe it has a root in the proto-Alemannic walhaz or "foreigner", wada or "ford", or wardana meaning "protector"; combined with denaraz meaning "palm" or "flat", or even the Foranic "dunom". Others have completely rejected either school, stating it has a Fiorentine or even a pre-Sifharo-Asuran origin.

History

Prehistory

Vvarden was inhabited, first by Homo erectus, then by Homo Glenmorensis. Archaeological findings from cavs in the Cerbantian mountains reveal that Vvarden was populated by hominids at least some 1 million years ago. Modern day humans are believed to have arrived from the east around 36,000 years ago, leaving behind cultural items such as cave paintings like those in ... . Vvarden is believed to have been one of the major refuges for early human populations within Asura during the ice age, and findings show the area was relatively populated and lively. In the Mesolithic period, a native culture developed, that of the ..., and later, with the introduction of the Bronze Age, megaliths and tumuli were constructed. In the Iron Age, the territory came under the cultural influence of the Foranics; the local Foranic peoples, known as the Callaecians, were composed of tribes such as the Luggones, the Pesicos, and others, who populated the entire area with fortified hill-towns.

Fiorentine Vvarden

Map of the Fiorentine Empire at its greatest extent in 80 CE

Vvarden was ultimately completely conquered by the Fiorentines over a period of two hundred years, and managed to continue control of it for another six hundred, bringing Fiorentine influence. This influence had a profound impact on the cultural and linguistic nature of Vvarden. The west became densely populated with Fiorentine speakers, assimilating the native Foranics, unlike the more rustic and sporadically controlled centre and east, controlled by the Callaecians. This enabled the Callaecian language to survive and evolve into modern Callae, albeit not without significant influence. Fiorentine rule was cemented through constructs such as roads, and bindings such as their laws. For most of the Fiorentine period, Vvarden acted as a granary for the empire, exporting olives, wool, gold, iron, lead, and wine across the empire. Agricultural yield boomed thanks to irrigation projects, like aqueducts, which still remain today in many parts of Vvarden. The Fiorentine Emperors ..., ..., ..., Lugonicus, and ... were born in Vvarden, along with the noted philosopher ... . Vvarden converted to Alydianism after missionaries came in around the 2nd century, quickly becoming popular. These Fiorentine and Callaecian influences went on to define much of Vvarden's later laws, languages, and its religions.

Post-Fiorentine Vvarden and the Kingdom of the Gautigoths=

Main articles: History of the Gautigothic Kingdom, Syagrii dynasty, and Amaling dynasty

The Fiorentine Walls of Sant'Eremo

In 399, Gautigothic tribes had entered Vvarden, looking for lands to settle and raid. Although the Fiorentine Empire began to disintegrate in the 4th century, leading to the abandonment of Vvarden by Emperor Sebastianus in 422, many of the successor regimes in Vvarden maintained many of the institutions and laws of the late empire. During the fall of the Fiorentine Empire, pirates from Wradhia and Cuirpthe began to raid the coast of Vvarden, and were followed in three centuries by Lhedwinic raiders. Some of the most prominent cities of Fiorentinized coastal Vvarden, having been disconnected from the Fiorentines since the abandonment of the province in 422, formed judicates (judicati) and banded together to resist invaders. Among the most notable of these judicates was Aeminium (near modern Conibria), ruled by the Syagrii family, who continued to style themselves as Dominates of the Fiorentine Empire. The Syagrii family eventually united these judicates, forming a briefly successful post-Fiorentine state in Vvarden. While officially calling themselves the rulers of the Fiorentine Empire, they also called themselves the Dukes of Lugonia, or Dux Lugoniae, and were elected from candidates in the family by a council of nobles. Up until their conquest at the hands of the Gautigoths in 524, the Dukes of Lugonia are seen as by many as the "the last of the Fiorentines."

Other notable states of post-Fiorentine Vvarden includes part of the Fiorento-Foranic kingdom of ..., which became a source of many legends and stories in the Middle Ages, such as the ... Cycle, based on the legendary King ... . In this time, Callaea was in the hands of several Fiorento-Foranic states in what was called the "Old East" or Sé Tusto. These states included Morodon, Temro, Breganto, and Daro. Many of these Post-Fiorentine Callaean states labelled themselves as dukes and princes of their dynasties rather than basing themselves off of geographical elements like the Callaecians, and it is in this time that clans such as the Au Verdorci, Au Briagoi, Au Cunocobri, Au Arcadi, and Au Bailai emerge. Many tribes would fight over the title of High King, although only a few succeeded to unite most of these clans.

The Last of Amal's Heirs, a painting by Agimer-Rre de Forssu depicting the tonsuring of Gandolfo Amaling

Most of Vvarden was eventually united by the Amaling dynasty of the Gautigoths in 524 under King Leoverto, creating the Amalic or Gautigothic Kingdom. Leoverto was also the first king to give written laws to the Gautigoths. His successors assumed the role of protectors of the Fiorentine rites of the Alydianist Church, against Foranic Alydianism in the north, and in these devastating wars many of the Amaling kings, such as Leoverto's sons Leodo I and Leodomiro I, were killed. Atanaxildo's descendant, Tedegildo III, who led armies to conquer Foranic lands and pagans in the east, is commonly seen as the last powerful Amaling King. In 820, upon the death of High King Xuntomiro, his lands were divided between his sons Xaudemiro and Xelimiro. Over the next few decades, Gautigothic lands shrank to foreign conquests and rebelling nobles until it was reduced to a rump state in western Vvarden. In 851, the Mayor of the Palace, Vermudo deposed the last member of the Amaling dynasty, Gandolfo Amaling, tonsuring him and exiling him to a monastery, ending over three hundred years of Gautigothic rule. With the support of the remaining nobility and the blessing of the Pontiff of Laterna, Vermudo became the first King of Lugonia (Rex Lugoniae).

Middle Ages

Santa Siana di Tavo, ancient palace of the Kings of Lugonia, built in 839 AD. Many churches of Vvarden are among the oldest churches of Asura since the Early Middle Ages.

In the east, following the example of Vermudo, Lugonian noble Doncado MacoBriago au Carantos, also known as Doncado Dono or Doncado the Brown, was able to seize several towns in the hilly and mountainous area of eastern Vvarden, crowning himself King of Callacia in 852. Doncado was a member of a clan who traced themselves back to a legendary Fiorentine noble by the name of Arcado Dubo who remained in Vvarden and resisted the Gautigoths.

Around the turn of the 10th century, names from purely ... origins like Vedorcu or Daucale or Malcunu became less common among the ruling classes, replaced by names that had either Gautigoth or Fiorentine origins like Ricmeru, Alfonsu, Remanu, and Vernandu. The name change reflects the increasingly changing nature of Vvarden entering the High Medieval Period, as influences from nearby Fiorentine-culture slowly replaced many aspects of traditional ... culture.

(WIP) The situation in Vvarden became increasingly complex and divisive by the time of the arrival of the Normaunds in the early 11th century. In 1007, Normaund pilgrims started travelling to Vvarden. They travelled in order to pay homage at certain holy sites, such as the Temple of St. Landus at Carnu, and the Monastery of St. Dimas on Monte Vindu. Others travelled to Vvarden as mercenaries, led by brothers Robert and Enguerrand de Brai, descendants of the legendary Boso de Brai. The brothers so distinguished themselves in service to Lugonia in the War of Brigantia that King Nepoxano gave them the frontier counties of Esarno, Eiras, Brega and Tirtocu in 1012. King Nepoxano had hoped to appease the issue of Normaund immigration into Vvarden by giving them a rural, impoverished, area to settle in, one devastated by recent wars. Nepoxano also hoped that the Normaunds could also act as a buffer when Celts would regain their strength and raid Lugonia. Contrary to his expectations, Robert, Enguerrand, and a third brother Raymond/Rreamun, who travelled to join them in 1013, were able to rebuild and fortify the area using advanced construction techniques picked up in their time in Mydroll, fortifying the land with many castles. The Brothers de Brai as they became known, quickly established themselves as powerful vassals of King Nepoxano, able to influence Lugonian politics to a large degree.

Wiscard de Brai being coronated as Prince of Talbreg by Archbishop Berengu I Calistes of Sant'Eremo
King Corràdu Borso of Floriana, and King Ordunu II of Lusitainu, depicted in 1212 in the Gesta Conradus Florianus, by Mauro Nurcada

Shortly after, in 1511, ... and ... were united in the Pact of Wernimes-Ogrobis, and their son Searles I combined the two kingdoms into a United Kingdom of ... .

Iberunian Empire

Liberalism and Searlesianists

The first ... king of Iberunia ..., claimed both his right to the throne and authority came from God, or divine right. This concept in many ways provided a justification for increasing centralisation, which continued until the end of the dynasty. This centralisation in many ways brought the monarchy into conflict with much of the aristocracy, many of which could trace their lineage back to feudal times.

Other issues increasing tensions included the shrinking proportion of land owned by ethnic ..., two centuries of mismanagement following the 1511 Union, and religious differences between the ... ... and the ... ... and ... .

Aurélio Cerxueira Moura, "The Grand Captain of Vvarden" finds the corpse of King Xaime II de ... in the aftermath of the Battle of Asti.

Nineteenth Century

Loisine War
King Antine in coronation robes. King Antine's death in 1802 sparked the Loisine War, splitting the House of Bregantinu into two rival branches until the death of Payo X in 1925

On his deathbed in April, 1802, the childless King Antine explicitly asked for the throne to pass to his neice, the Princess Maria de Bregantinu, who in his mind had proved herself a capable heir to the throne. However, there was another claimant in the form of the absolutist Lois de Bregantinu-Wisardi, Maria's brother, who rejected Antine's choice as heir. Many of Lois' supporters were alarmed by the liberal reforms that had been initiated across most of Western Asura, inspired by similar changes in Midrasia, and had rejected compromises for constitutional monarchies. The increasing deadlock between the two sides in the weeks after Payo VII's death was forced open when Maria became crowned Maria II on May 4th, 1802. As a result, militias loyal to Lois, who claimed the title of Lois V, rose up in reactionary and conservative areas of Vvarden.

The war fundamentally split the House of Bregantinu into two lines: the Marian Line, or the House of Bregantinu-Agramont, and later Bregantinu-Agramont-Osraige; and the Loisine Line, or the House of Bregantinu-Wisardi.

Twentieth Century

The Great War

King Payo’s regime was racked with difficulties in the aftermath of the Great War while Payo himself was faced with different personal tragedies within his life. During the Great War, his youngest brother Lois-Felip was killed during the Battle of Alfoz. In 1911 his wife and the Queen of Vvarden, Queen Uxía was assassinated by a Bevenian anarchist and in 1914 his eldest son and heir to the Crown of Vvarden, Crown Prince Lois, committed suicide in the mysterious Allariz Incident. In 1919 his remaining son and heir, Crown Prince Payo was assassinated at the Praza das Igrexas in Vvarden's capital with Payo himself wounded by the assassin. The deaths of most of his immediate family affected his reign and the political atmosphere around the crown, with many politicians calling into question both his family line and the survival of the monarchy.

Rei Payo X, King of Vvarden from 1901-1923. Payo X's reign was wracked with government incompetence, economic stagnation, deaths within his family, and civil unrest.

There were several reasons as to the downfall of the monarchy and the installation of a republic: Since the Loisine War in the early 1860s, autocratic support had chipped away at the legitimacy of the constitutional monarchy, with followers of the reactionary Loisine line opposing them at every turn; Growing government ineffectiveness, especially during the Prime Ministerships of Samuèli Araimmund de Isorna, and Lino Pau Seddori, turned the opinion of those in the government against the monarchy, which had failed to curb such excesses; The marriage of Payo X to the unpopular Princess Gwenfrewi Gwallteuraidh of tir Lhaeraidd who many thought was a spy, had not fully converted to Alydianism, or had arranged for the secret conversion of Payo to paganism; That when Vvarden did solve the issue of intervention with the advice of the monarchy in the First Great War, dreams of territorial ambitions on behalf of the Concordat were crushed with demands for repatriations in the aftermath; Finally the deaths of Payo's heirs meant that if Payo were to die, the throne would pass to a member of the Loisine line, who would undoubtedly seek to impose autocratic rule, thus a republic began to be seen by many as a necessary evil to protect Vvarden from an absolute monarch.

Civil War and Second World War

Post-War Liberalisation and Ovalleism

Contemporary Vvarden

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Music and Dance

The Vvardenese band The Otters, 1965; left to right: Soan MacoEnri, Conni MacoArta, Rori Leize, Jordi d'Eglesia.

Various regional styles of folk music abound across Vvarden, ranging from ..., to ... styles, to ... . Pop, rock, hip hop and heavy metal are also popular. One of the most popular musical groups of the 20th century, the Otters or "Em Duruhus" originated in Vvarden and quickly spread worldwide, changing the face of popular music and reaching almost a billion units sold internationally by their breakup in 1972.

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