Akashian general election, 2022

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Akashian general election, 2022

← 2018 25 June 2022 2026 →

400 seats in the National Assembly
201 seats needed for a majority
Turnout84,5%
  First party Second party Third party
  LianaFerrari(small).jpg Yoshito Sengoku 201011.png RiseTakashima(small).jpg
Leader Liana Ferrari Keizō Takai Rise Takashima
Party URP SP CP
Last election 42 seats
12,7% PR
9,2% STV
75 seats
16,4% PR
16,0% STV
58 seats
13,0% PR
13,5% STV
Seats won 100 64 60
Seat change Increase 58 Decrease 11 Increase 2
PR vote 1.336.823 1.129.934 1.058.318
% and swing 16,8%
Increase 4,1%
14,2%
Decrease 2,2%
13,3%
Increase 0,3%
STV vote 1.379.868 1.116.656 1.084.751
% and swing 17,3%
Increase 8,1%
14,0%
Decrease 2,0%
13,6%
Increase 0,1%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  MomokaNishimura.jpg
Leader Kazunori Takata Hiroshi Sone Momoka Nishimura
Party GP MPP FP
Last election 40 seats
10,5% PR
10,9% STV
70 seats
16,0% PR
15,6% STV
41 seats
7,6% PR
11,2% STV
Seats won 36 35 46
Seat change Decrease 4 Decrease 35 Increase 5
PR vote 891.215 875.301 835.514
% and swing 11,2%
Increase 0,7%
11,0%
Decrease 5,0%
10,5%
Increase 2,9%
STV vote 797.611 837.492 917.253
% and swing 10,0%
Decrease 0,9%
10,5%
Decrease 5,1%
11,5%
Increase 0,3%

Akashi-election-general-2022.png
Most voted party by province

Prime Minister before election

Kōko Kaga
SP

Prime Minister after election

TBD

A general election was held in Akashi on 25 June 2022. It was dubbed the "juniors' election" (Miranian: 後輩の選挙 Kōhai no senkyo) due to the underperformance of the traditional large parties, and corresponding gains by the smaller parties.

Kōko Kaga had announced her resignation before the election. Her successor as Socialist Party leader, Keizō Takai, was seen as a "party insider" lacking in charisma or popular appeal. However, the same issue affected Moderate People's Party leader Hiroshi Sone, contesting his fourth general election since 2010 and still struggling to connect with the public.

With the largest two parties led by uninspiring figures, the smaller parties seized the opening and dominated the election campaign. Communist Party leader Rise Takashima and Future Party leader Momoka Nishimura worked well together, building on their previous collaboration in 2018.

United Reform Party leader Liana Ferrari completed a remarkable political comeback since her humiliation during the "red wave" of 2010. She seized from Hiroshi the mantle of rallying figure for the centre-right, emphasising her ministerial record and her more sedate public image than in previous decades.

Polls remained close throughout the election campaign, contributing to a high degree of interest and media speculation in the shape of the new government to come.

Results

General election, 25 June 2022
Akashi-election-gen-2022.svg
Party Party list Constituency Total
seats
+/-
PR % +/− STV % +/−
United Reform Party 1.336.823 16,8% +4,1% 1.379.868 17,3% +8,1% 100 +58
Socialist Party 1.129.934 14,2% -2,2% 1.116.656 14,0% -2,0% 64 -11
Communist Party 1.058.318 13,3% +0,3% 1.084.751 13,6% +0,1% 60 +2
Green Party 891.215 11,2% +0,7% 797.611 10,0% -0,9% 36 -4
Moderate People's Party 875.301 11,0% -5,0% 837.492 10,5% -5,1% 35 -35
Future Party 835.514 10,5% +2,9% 917.253 11,5% +0,3% 46 +5
National Cooperative Party 636.582 8,0% ±0,0% 717.850 9,0% +0,3% 31 +1
National Union 557.010 7,0% -0,2% 510.471 6,4% -0,2% 16 -2
Conservative National Party 190.975 2,4% -0,4% 175.474 2,2% -0,3% 0 -6
Akashi Renewal Party 167.103 2,1% -0,4% 159.522 2,0% -0,4% 0 -6
Independents 278.505 3,5% +0,2% 279.164 3,5% +0,1% 12 -2
Total 7.957.279 100% 7.976.113 100% 400
Registered voters and turnout 9.416.898 84,5% 9.416.898 84,7%
Bloc strength
Bloc Parties Seats
Crimson bloc CP, GP 96
Pale crimson bloc SP, NU 80
Light yellow bloc NCP, FP 77
Light blue bloc MPP, URP 135
Dark blue bloc CNP, ARP 0
  • Government: TBD

The SP fell to second place, although its losses of 2% of the vote and 11 seats were seen as modest. The big surprise was the MPP's fall to fifth place, losing 5% of votes and 35 seats. The URP supplanted them as the largest centre-right party and surged to a plurality of 100 seats, with gains of 4–8%.

The smaller parties once again experienced modest improvements or setbacks. The CP remained firmly in third place, gaining two seats. The FP increased its proportional vote by 2% but less so in constituencies, translating to a 4 seat gain. The NCP gained an extra seat, while the GP and NU lost 4 and 2, respectively.

The most celebrated part of the results on the night was the ejection of the dark blue bloc from the legislature — the CNP and ARP both lost their constituency seat, depriving them of the party-list seats they had qualified for.

In the new legislature, the light blue bloc held a plurality, but had only gained 23 seats. The crimson bloc still outnumbered the pale crimson bloc, which fell further behind by 13 seats. However, their combined tally was 176 seats — further away from a majority than before, but still outnumbering the light blue bloc. This put the light yellow bloc and independents in a kingmaker position.