Quinn Werner

Quinn Werner
Jean Chrétien 2010 (cropped).jpg
Quinn Werner in 2019
27th President of Zamastan
In office
September 22nd, 1976 – September 22nd, 1980
Preceded byElene Abotsford
Succeeded byAiden Avery
Personal details
BornApril 8th, 1942
Emerald, Pahl, Zamastan
DiedJanuary 27th, 2021 (Age: 78)
Abagene, Pahl, Zamastan
Cause of deathLiver cancer
NationalityZamastanian
Political partyGreen Liberal Party (Zamastan)
Height5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Spouse(s)Hera Maria Werner
ChildrenConnie, Maria, Gavin

Quinn Werner was the 27th President of Zamastan, taking office in the 1976 election after Elene Abotsford. Before the presidency, he was a professional hockey player and later became a congressman and the head of the Committee on National Youth Development. Werner’s first act as President was to revamp the education system of Zamastan, allowing for public school programs that were more inclusive to originally less opportunistic families. He also created a national food service program that distributed government mandated foods to poorer income families that proved incapable to sustain for themselves. These public service projects shaped the inclusive and modern day civil prosperity ratings of Zamastan, which measure the livability factors of each aspect of the nation. Experts widely agree that these programs greatly improved life for Zamastan citizens as a whole. Due to the increase of food distribution and education reforms, the generations of Zamastanians became more healthy and intelligent as a whole.

Werner advocated immensely against illegal substance usage and smoking. He and his wife, Hera Maria Werner, broadcast weekly television prompts from the Presidential Mansion to encourage young people and older generations alike to drop bad and unhealthy habits and adopt a healthier lifestyle. Werner was originally a proponent of legalized marijuana usage, but amongst his promotion to the Committee on National Youth Development, he understood the possibilities of weed being used as a gateway drug and famously advised kids to “Stay away from bad stuff”. Hera Werner took a platform against bullying in schools, and often visited the nation’s institutions and met one-on-one with teachers and students. She is to this day one of the most renowned First Ladies of Zamastan.

Early - Young Adult Life

Quinn Werner was born on April 8th, 1942, in Emerald, Pahl, Zamastan, the son of Phyllis and Walter Werner. The family moved into a house in Abagene seven months after Quinn was born, chosen partly because its yard was flat enough to make an ice rink on every winter. Walter taught Quinn and his friends hockey on a rink he made in the back yard of the family home, nicknamed the "Wally Coliseum". Drills included skating around bleach bottles and tin cans, and flipping pucks over scattered hockey sticks to be able to pick up the puck again in full flight. Quinn grew to love hockey and fellowship with his friends. In college, he played for the Tofino University Varsity Team. There, he met and married his wife, Hera Maria Pannisberg, on May 19th, 1961.

Professional Hockey Career

In 1962, the Zamastan Hockey League team "Emerald Bulls" courted Werner. Bulls owner John F. Bassett wanted to confront the league by signing as many young and promising superstars as possible and saw Werner as the most promising young prospect. On June 12, 1962, signed 20-year-old Werner to a seven-year personal services contract worth Z$1.75 million. Werner scored his first professional goal against Dave Dryden of the Tofino Seals in his fifth game, and his second goal four seconds later. In 1965, after three seasons in the league, Werner retired following the birth of his daughter, Connie.

Political Career

Following his daughter's birth, Quinn set his sights on politics. His community rallied around him as a strong supporter of youth development programs, and in 1968, Quinn was elected to congress.

Committee on National Youth Development

Quinn was appointed to head the Committee on National Youth Development, where he campaigned for legislation that would keep youth away from drug abuse and domestic violence issues.

Campaign for President, 1976

In 1976, Werner announced his intention and candidacy for President of Zamastan. Facing off against Elene Abotsford, who was seeking a third term, he won the election running alongside the Liberal Party affiliations.

Presidency

Quinn Werner assumed the office on September 22nd, 1976. Werner’s first act as President was to revamp the education system of Zamastan, allowing for public school programs that were more inclusive to originally less opportunistic families. He also created a national food service program that distributed government mandated foods to poorer income families that proved incapable to sustain for themselves. These public service projects shaped the inclusive and modern day civil prosperity ratings of Zamastan, which measure the livability factors of each aspect of the nation. Experts widely agree that these programs greatly improved life for Zamastan citizens as a whole. Due to the increase of food distribution and education reforms, the generations of Zamastanians became more healthy and intelligent as a whole.

Werner advocated immensely against illegal substance usage and smoking. He and his wife, Hera Maria Werner, broadcast weekly television prompts from the Presidential Mansion to encourage young people and older generations alike to drop bad and unhealthy habits and adopt a healthier lifestyle. Werner was originally a proponent of legalized marijuana usage, but upon his promotion to the Committee on National Youth Development, he understood the possibilities of weed being used as a gateway drug and famously advised kids to “Stay away from bad stuff”.

Running for a third term, he lost in 1980 to Aiden Avery.

Post-Presidency

After the presidency, Werner continued to advocate for youth programs around the country, and founded several charities dedicated to hockey clubs, drug treatment centers, and educational reform programs.

Werner was also a proponent for international human rights, often traveling on behalf of the Zamastanian presidential administrations following his to be a representative for their foreign policies regarding the betterment of human rights.

Werner and his wife Hera became close friends with the Royal Family of Rio Palito, often spending time with Maurice II and his daughter, Izabell I.

Death

Werner passed away from complications with liver cancer on January 27th, 2021, at his home in Abagene. He had been battling the cancer for three years, and had been hospitalized multiple times.

Funeral

President Quinn Werner's state funeral was held on February 1st, 2021.

Reactions

Domestic

  • Former-President Zacharias Castovia: "President Werner's life and legacy long outlasted his administration. He was a great man, a skilled politician, and a loving family man. Time and time again, President Werner displayed the best in humanity, reaching across to meet those who needed help, and granting them the opportunity and promise of our nation, that everyone is equal and everyone deserves better. That's what we as Zamastanians should be, and President Quinn Werner was so exceptionally more. The nation has lost a true gentlemen, and we will mourn his passing while celebrating his life."
  • Former-President Anya Bishop: "Werner's prestigious impartiality reached everyone without favoritism. His kindness exceeded so many politicians of his era or mine, and it's hard to find someone like him nowadays. Despite our differences, I had high respect for the late President, and I know that he is resting peacefully with a well deserved awaiting from the Lord, where his good deeds and legacy speak for themselves here on earth. Rest in peace, Mister President."
  • Speaker of the Chamber Natasha Chastain: "President Werner's legacy will live on through the ages. A beacon of liberal ideals and a beacon of humanity, President Werner excemplified the best of us. Condolences to the entirity of the Werner family, we have lost a great hero."

International

  • East Chanchajilla: "President Gideon Boer sends his regards to the family of the late, great Quinn Werner. Despite a short tenure in the Presidency, his actions made Zamastan a more inclusive, safe place. Combatting drug abuse, championing civil rights, and his remarkable political skill and charisma left a profound impact on all that he interacted and worked with. Former-President Rafael Arroyo, who served as the 5th President of the Republic of Chanchajilla from 1975-79, knew Werner as an ally, a moderator, and a friend. He also released a statement praising the passed President, saying that he was a "titan of the Zamastanian political spectrum, and his legacy will long outlive his passing as his Presidential legacy outlived his term.""
  • Caspia: King Adrian Lindholm - "When I ascended the throne in 1977, I did not have many allies. My father had passed unexpectedly, the country was in economic ruin, and the Cold War was sending fear across the world. A spirited young politician from Zamastan had recently taken the Presidency and reached out to our island nation when we needed it the most. Quinn Werner, whether inspired by the potential of capital or the potential of political gain, nonetheless reached to our nation and helped dig us out of the rut. President Werner, from that point on, continued to be a friend and an ally to our nation. The people of Zamastan have truly lost a great stateman today, and I have lost a close friend. Long rest in a well blessed peace, Mister President. Thank you for the life you led and the legacy you leave behind."
  • Quetana: President António Brafeo - "While I never had the opportunity to meet Quinn Werner, his constituents always spoke highly of him. His driving and persistent work for international education for the under-educated, his work for health and life and liberty, and his demeanor was world famous. Quetana, as Zamastan does now, mourns the loss of a great President and a great man. I will be in attendance for the funeral of President Quinn Werner to pay respects, as will former Presidents Nuno Lumeo and Óscar Cavaco."
  • Alecburgh - "This may not be the way many in my nation would like me to come out and talk about for the first time, but I must address this loss. Although I had never met Former President Werner, as I was too young, my father had. In the time I had him on this Earth with me, he did speak ill of many people but never did Werner come up in one of those tirades. Alecburgh stands with Zamastan, Werner's family, and this world during this sad hour. Rest in Peace Hero of Zamastan, Quinn Werner."
  • Jyau: Chancellor Matthias Cerfbeer - "President Werner's life was a unique one. Most politicians seek power to undermine, power to hold, but Werner used his power genuinely. He used it to bestow goodness and helpfulness, speaking kindness and generosity. Even those who disagreed with his policy could never state that he was malintent, he was looking to construct and save. He looked for the good in each person, and he usually found it. I met Quinn Werner at the Winter Olympics in 2019 in Agiakaia, Vitosium. He and I shared an avid love for hockey, and although we came from different political generations, I recognized the love he had for others that transcended the generation. I will miss and mourn my friend, and I send my condolences to Hera and Quinn's children, and I pray for Zamastan in their days of mourning to come."
  • Jyau: Former-Chancellor Aurelia Holmes - "Quinn was a liberal, I am a socialist. We were in our respective offices at the same time in 1976 until 1980. We had similar ideologies, although I acknowledge the Jyaueze version of what Zamastanians would consider liberal is more to the left. What I do know is that Quinn never cared about that. He rarely bothered with one's politics. He always cared more about the person and the soul. Quinn Werner was a remarkable man, one that our world doesn't often see nowadays. I mourn my friend, Quinn Martin Werner, and I await the day I see you again."
  • Albarine: Chancellor Sadie Melhaven - "President Quinn Werner and his Presidency were marked by grace, civility, and social conscience. In our few interactions over the year, often in the company of one of my role models and fellow-late President Elene Abotsford, his kindness and hospitality was the first thing I took note of. He smiled through his eyes, and his gentle demeanor was inspiring and warm. The world mourns the loss of a great Zamastanian, he was a man of integrity. Albarineans join our Zamastanian friends in mourning the death of Quinn Werner expressing heartfelt condolences to his children and the rest of the Werner family. I will be in attendance for the state funeral of President Werner, and I have ordered all state flags of Albarine to be lowered to half-mast in remembrance."
  • Rio Palito: Queen Izabell Bousieras - "My father, King Maurice II, was close friends with President Quinn Werner. When I was young, Mr. Werner would visit the palace here in San Beausoleil and spend time with my family and subsequently me. He was affectionately called Uncle Quinn, and he was like family to mine. Dear President, your love for my father, your love for my mother, and your love for me was an important component of my childhood, a significant piece that turned my upbringing more unique than other monarchs of past. My father, who passed in 2017, was eulogized by President Werner. My mother, who passed months ago, was also eulogized by Quinn. His personal connection to our family in the years following his presidency is an indicator of the personal responsibility he took on making relation and connection with others. We’ve all lost a wonderful man, and Rio Palito mourns the loss of our friend, Sir Quinn Werner."
  • Sulifa: King Abdur Rasheed el-Abad - "He was in fact the first Zamastanian President that I was privileged to meet. I recall being deeply touched by his concern for the Sulifan people. It is truly admirable to have lived such a rich life. While nothing can replace the loss of a President, we can rejoice in the fact that his was a meaningful life, dedicated to public service. I commend the Werner family for encouraging their children, including you my dear friend, to devote yourselves to the service of others."