Taoiseach of Caldia

Taoiseach of Caldia
Sauli Niinistö - 171106-D-GY869-041 (37501659204) (cropped).jpg
Incumbent
Stiofán Mac Suibhne

since 27 February 2019
StyleYour Excellency (A Shoilse)
ResidenceLoveland House
NominatorComhthionól Náisiúnta
AppointerMonarch of the Caldia by convention, based on appointee's ability to command confidence in the Comhthionól Náisiúnta.
Term lengthAt His Majesty's pleasure, so long as elections are held no more than five years apart.
Inaugural holderDónall Ó Conaill
Formation1857
DeputyTánaiste
Salary€185,350
Websitetaoiseach.gl


The Taoiseach is the head of government of Caldia. The Taoiseach is appointed by the monarch after securing the support of the lower house of the Tionól, the Comhthionól Náisiúnta. In order to remain in office, the Taoiseach a majority in the Comhthionól must continue to provide their support. The current Taoiseach is Stiofán Mac Suibhne, TC, who was appointed on 27 February 2019.

The word means "chief" in the Ghaillish language. The earliest known use of the term is from a 5th- or 6th-century ogham inscription in both the Tenic languages. Internationally, the office is colloquially referred to as the premier or prime minister of Caldia. Taoiseach is the official title in Ghaillish, Gaullican, and Estmerish. It is not used for the heads of government for other countries. Instead, prime ministers are referred to in Ghaillish as Príomh Aire and the Ghaillish language uses premier as a Gaullican-loanword for premiers.

Overview

Under the Constitution of Caldia, the Taoiseach is nominated by a simple majority of Comhthionól Náisiúnta from among its members. This means a Taoiseach must receive the support of 200 TCs in order to be nominated. Following a nomination, he or she is then formally appointed to office by the monarch. The monarch is required to appoint whomever the Comhthionól designates without the option of declining appointment.

If the Taoiseach loses the support of a majority in Comhthionól Náisiúnta, he or she is not automatically removed from office. If a motion of no confidence in the Taoiseach is passed, he or she will be removed from office but the current government will remain in place. The Taoiseach's deputy, the Tánaiste, then assumes the powers of the position until the governing party names a new leader or until the legislative term ends. This happens infrequently, as it does not require a new election. Most often, a motion of no confidence in the Government is passed. If such a motion is passed, the Taoiseach is compelled to either resign or persuade the monarch to dissolve the Comhthionól and allow for new elections. The monarch may refuse to grant a dissolution, effectively forcing the Taoiseach to remain in office and form a care-taker government until the legislative term ends. To date, no monarch has exercised this prerogative despite it being permitted under the constitution. Additionally, the failure of a vote of confidence in the Comhthionól Náisiúnta may result in a Taoiseach's resignation or the dissolution of the sitting Comhthionól.

When a Taoiseach submits his or her resignation, the incumbent officeholder continues to carry out the powers of the office until the nomination of a successor by the Comhthionól Náisiúnta.

As the head of government, the Taoiseach is responsible for nominating all additional members of the Government. Government ministers nominated by the Taoiseach at the start of their term are confirmed at the same time by the Comhthionól Náisiúnta. Ministers are then formally appointed by the monarch. Should a government minister resign or be dismissed during a legislative term, any new nomination must be individually approved by the Comhthionól Náisiúnta before the monarch can make the formal appointment. For a government minister to be dismissed, the Taoiseach advises the monarch to dismiss him or her from her office. The monarch is required to follow this advice by constitutional convention. The Taoiseach is supported by the Executive Bureau, the government department responsible for assisting him or her in executing the powers of the office. The Taoiseach's Office is explicitly responsible for supporting the Taoiseach, but all other agencies within the Executive Bureau offer support in practice.

In addition to, the Taoiseach is also given the constitutional power to directly appoint fifteen members of the Seanad.

Taoiseachs are also members of the Council of State, where they serve from their ascension to the office until their death.

Name

The word taoiseach means chief in Ghaillish. Historically, it was the name given to leaders of clans. The title was also used by early rulers of the Kingdom of Ghailles who were referred to as the Great Chief. When the Kingdom of Caldia was established, the title was granted to the monarch's steward. Royal stewards were known as the Chief of the King or Chief of the Queen. The title was replaced by the position of Laird Chancellor during the 13th century.

History

The position of Taoiseach was created in 1857 under the Instrument for Governance Act of 1857. Following the Silent Revolution and the demand for greater political representation, the creation of the Comhthionól Náisiúnta would result in the demand for the post. King Elton I and the Seanad both approved of its creation.

A statue of Dónall Ó Conaill, the first Taoiseach, in his native Shanbally.

The creation of the office would remove considerable authority from the Seanad, and as such made the principal house of the Tionól.

The office was predeceased by the Laird Chancellor. Under the Constitution of Caldia, executive authority was held by the monarch, who would often delegate such authority to the Laird Chancellor. The position of Laird Chancellor has its earliest roots in the thirteenth century during the reforms of King Alastar. However, both the monarch and the Laird Chancellor retained significant authority. The Laird Chancellorship was almost always held by peer or bishop. The only Taoiseach who was a peer during their tenure was the Duke of Holyhead.

The first Taoiseach was Dónall Ó Conaill, a former Laird Chancellor, former senator and prominent reformer. He was a principal leader of the Silent Revolution. Ó Conaill was a member of and the leader of the Caldish Democrats, the party which heavily campaigned for the creation of a more democratized house. Ó Conaill would serve two terms as Taoiseach, with the first lasting from 1857-1862 and the second from 1867-1872.

Since the office's creation, there have been thirty-one Taoiseachs from four political parties. All but eight Taoiseachs have served for the full duration of their five-year terms. Conán Ó Faoláin is the only Taoiseach to have died while in office while Liam O'Mathuna failed to defeat a motion of no confidence. Taoiseachs Brigid O'Reilly and Rory Mac Ailín, and Humphrey Dumfries are the only Taoiseachs who have both been in power during snap election and to have had their parties defeated in a snap election. Niamh Nic Uilliam and Frank Casarnach were dismissed from their office following intervention from the monarch. Alexis Walker resigned before the 2017 Caldish general election. Jimmy O'Reilly resigned from the office after a diplomatic scandal in 2018. Séamus Ó Faoláin held the office for only three months before being defeated in the 2002 election.

The Instrument for Governance Act of 1965 removed virtually all powers from the Seanad. As a result, the power of the Taoiseach increased significantly as they no longer had to cooperate with the Cathaoirleach to ensure their legislation would pass the Seanad. The need for reform arose following the Government Crisis of 1965 in which the majority of elected Seanad seats were held by the Liberty Party. As a result the Cathaoirleach, Dónal Ó Loingsigh, was a member of the Liberty Party. He used his seat to delay major reforms pursued by Taoiseach Mary O'Neill by refusing to put them up for a vote. Instead of calling for a snap election or waiting for the 1966 Seanad election, O'Neill instead pushed to strip the upper house of the bulk of its powers. The Instrument for Governance Act of 1965 was passed with a two-thirds super majority after negotiations between the parties sitting in the Comhthionól. After her reforms were implemented, the Taoiseach was granted the power to appoint eleven senators, an increase from the five previously permitted. This is done in order to ensure the government has a majority in the Seanad, which now only has the powers to review and delay legislation.

Family

The family of the Taoiseach has no official title or role. However, family members are often identified as members of the Dara Teaghlaigh (Second Family) in the Caldish press. This is due to their secondary status to the Royal Family. The phrase Dara Teaghlaigh first became popular in the 1990s and has since remained.

Residence

The official residence of the Taoiseach, the Loveland House. The residence is located on the Royal Mile in Spálgleann.

List of office holders

Parties

No. Name
(Birth–Death)
Portrait Party Term of office Last office held before election Monarch
1 Dónall Ó Conaill
(TBD)
Sir Walter Scott Portrait.jpg Caldish Democrats 12 June
1857
12 June
1862
Laird Chancellor Elton I
2 Patrick Haughey
(TBD)
George Hamilton-Gordon cph.3b31157 (cropped).jpg National Conservative Party 12 June
1862
12 June
1867
Leader of His Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition Elton I
1 Dónall Ó Conaill
(TBD)
Sir Walter Scott Portrait.jpg Caldish Democrats 12 June
1867
12 June
1872
Leader of His Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition Elton I
3 Brian Quinn
(TBD)
Lord John Russell.jpg National Conservative Party 12 June
1872
12 June
1877
TBD Elton I
4 Maureen Guinness
(TBD)
Elizabeth Stanton.jpg Caldish Democrats 12 June
1877
12 June
1882
TBD Elton I
Mary IV
5 Donagh McCarthy
(TBD)
James G. Blaine - Brady-Handy.jpg National Conservative Party 12 June
1882
21 April
1885
TBD Mary IV
6 Robert MacDouglas
(TBD)
Charles Stewart Parnell - Brady-Handy.jpg National Conservative Party 21 April
1885
12 June
1887
TBD Mary IV
7 Eamon Brady
(TBD)
George B McClellan - c1880.jpg Caldish Democrats 12 June
1887
12 June
1897
TBD Mary IV
8 Elizabeth Higgins
(TBD)
Alice Paul cph.3a38295.jpg National Conservative Party 12 June
1897
12 June
1902
TBD Mary IV
9 Conán Ó Faoláin
(TBD)
John Redmond 1917.JPG Caldish Democrats 12 June
1902
8 April
1906
TBD Mary IV
10 Leonard McGarry
(TBD)
William O'Brien 1917.jpg National Conservative Party 8 April
1906
12 June
1912
TBD Mary IV
11 Saorla Ní Chonaill
(TBD)
Cutting 5375681482 dd9fba2eaa o.jpg Caldish Democrats 12 June
1912
12 June
1917
TBD Mary IV
12 Brigid O'Reilly
(TBD)
Portrait of Julia Lathrop.jpg National Conservative Party 12 June
1917
4 September
1919
TBD Mary IV
13 Liam O'Mathuna
(TBD)
Eamon de Valera c 1922-30.jpg Caldish Democrats 4 September
1919
29 November
1925
TBD Mary IV
14 Éamon Ua Buachalla
(TBD)
William Butler Yeats by George Charles Beresford.jpg Caldish Democrats 29 November
1925
1 February
1935
TBD Mary IV
Ellen II
15 Tomás Mag Fhearadhaigh
(TBD)
Ramsay-MacDonald (cropped).jpg Social Democratic 1 February
1935
12 June
1937
TBD Ellen II
16 Eleanore Rosaiteir
11 October 1893-26 November 1961
Eleanor Roosevelt in New York City - NARA - 195376.tif Liberty Party 12 June
1937
12 June
1952
TBD Ellen II
17 Seamus Macaulay
(TBD)
Charles Haughey 1967.jpg Social Democratic 12 June
1952
12 June
1957
TBD Ellen II
18 Wallace Mór Fitzgerald
(TBD)
Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr. 1938.jpg Liberty Party 12 June
1957
12 June
1962
TBD Ellen II
19 Máire Ní Néill
(TBD)
Mme Barbara Castle, Ministre britannique du développement outre-mer.jpg Social Democratic 12 June
1962
12 June
1967
TBD Ellen II
20 Rory Mac Ailín
(TBD)
James Chichester-Clark 1970.jpg Social Democratic 12 June
1967
21 March
1969
TBD Ellen II
21 Dáibhí Mac Coinneach
(TBD)
Alec Douglas-Home (c1963).jpg Liberty Party 21 March
1975
12 June
1977
TBD Ellen II
22 Mícheál Ó Muilleoir
(24 April 1921 - 6 August 2012)
Mícheál Ó Muilleoir.png Social Democratic 20 June
1977
21 June
1982
Leader of His Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition Ellen II
23 Patricia Flowers
b. 17 February 1929
PatriciaFlowers.jpg Liberty Party 21 June
1982
22 June
1992
Leader of His Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition Ellen II
24 Niamh Nic Uilliam
b. 27 February 1949
Niamh Nic Uilliam 1.jpg Social Democratic 22 June
1992
17 March
2002
Leader of His Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition Ellen II
Elton II
25 Séamus Ó Faoláin
b. 8 November 1948
Gordon Brown smiles.jpg Social Democratic 17 March
2002
17 June
2002
Tánaiste and Minister of the Interior Elton II
26 Énna Ó Ceallaigh
b. 4 March 1948
Enda Kelley.jpg Liberty Party 18 June
2002
17 June
2007
Leader of His Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition Elton II
27 Alexis Walker
b. 15 August 1950
Alexis Walker.jpg Liberty Party 17 June
2007
20 April
2017
Minister of Foreign Affairs Elton II
Kenneth IV
28 Jimmy O'Reilly
b. 27 April 1976
Jimmy O'Reilly.jpg Liberty Party 20 April
2017
7 May
2018
Minister of Justice and Equality Kenneth IV
29 Frank Casarnach
b. 5 November 1949
2017-09-24 Thomas de Maizière by Sandro Halank–3.jpg Liberty Party 7 May
2018
5 January
2019
Minister of Foreign Affairs Kenneth IV
30 Humphrey Dumfries
b. 20 April 1954
Eric Pickles, October 2009 1 cropped.jpg Liberty Party 5 January
2019
27 February
2019
Minister of Finance Kenneth IV
31 Stiofán Mac Suibhne
b. 8 November 1948
Sauli Niinistö - 171106-D-GY869-041 (37501659204) (cropped).jpg Social Democratic 27 February
2019
Present Leader of His Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition Kenneth IV

Living former Taoiseachs

As of 2018 there are eight living former Taoiseachs. The last Taoiseach to die was Mícheál Ó Muilleoir in 2003, who served as Taoiseach from 1977-1982.