Succession to the Latin throne

Succession to the Latin throne is based on descent, religion and legitimacy. Traditionally, succession follows to the Monarch's children, children's line or for a childless Monarch to their nearest collateral line. Under the most recent update of the Acts of Succession, one must be legitimate, Fabrian Catholic, and eligible under the many other requirements to be considered an eligible heir.

Individuals whom meet the basic requirements to retain a place in succession may otherwise be deemed ineligible due to disclaimer. Any individual holding a place in succession may freely disclaim themselves, which results in that individual being treated as if they were legally dead for the purposes of succession. Individuals in the line of succession may also be forced to disclaim themselves under certain circumstances such as: standing for public office, marriage to a reigning foreign monarch (though most often does not occur until after a child is born of that union), etc. One of the most well known methods of forced disclaimer happens as the result of not having his or her marriage approved by the reigning Monarch. Failing to obtain Sovereign's consent to marriage results in an automatic disclaimer and forfeiture of any titles or related benefits to being a member of the Imperial household. Sovereign's consent to marriage is only required for individuals possessing an Imperial title; in most instances this means children or siblings of a reigning Monarch.

Current line of succession

First six in line from 9 June 2020
1. The Prince of Youth
2. The Princess Diana
3. The Prince Peter Prince Peter of Latium.jpg
4. The Prince Philip
5. The Crown Princess of Dakmoor Maria of Latium at event.jpg
6. The Princess Leona Leona of Latium.jpg

Below is the current line of succession. This list is limited to immediate decedents of Empress Diana Augusta. The current laws of the Acts of Succession provide that Fabrian Catholic heirs of the body, or legitimate born children, are eligible to succeed to the throne. "Heirs of the body" is defined in the Acts of Succession as being male-preference primogeniture, where older children and their descendants inherit before younger children, and a male child takes precedence over a female sibling. Any amendments to the Acts of Succession are at the sole discretion of the reigning Monarch. Any child born out of wedlock is excluded from succession unless otherwise legitimized by decree of the reigning Monarch. Further rules of succession include Sovereign's consent to marriage (though only of dynasts that are children of a Sovereign), and marriage to a spouse following the "Latin Church", which was first added following the East-West Schism. The "Latin Church" is often interpreted to mean both the Catholic Church, and some Protestant churches.

Notes and sources
Mark Source for listing or note on exclusion from succession
D This person has been excluded from the official line of succession by forfeiting their eligibility through disclaimer.
I this person is not eligible to succeed the throne due to illegitimacy.
XR This person is barred from the succession by being a foreign Sovereign or marrying a foreign Sovereign.
SC This person is barred from the succession by marrying without the Sovereign's consent.
XC This person has been barred from succession for not being part of the Fabrian Catholic Church.

Alternative successions to the Latin crown

Descendants of Peter of Adrianople

This line's claim to the throne is based on the belief that Emperor Theodosius V was not the lawful Latin Emperor due to his illegitimate birth. Peter I of Adrianople was the youngest son and child of Empress Maria Augusta, and a member of the Claudii dynasty that ruled Latium and its territories from 556 AD until its last emperor, Emperor Peter III, was overthrown in the Crisis of the 11th Century. Peter of Adrianople and his descendants would rule from Adrianople and continue to claim the Imperial mantle from the city of Adrianople on Latium's west coast until 1331 when the pretender Emperor Michael I of Adrianople renounced his claims on the Latin throne to retain his family's lands and ducal titles. Members of the Claudii again asserted their claim during the Great Council of 1842, claiming that the throne had been illegally held by usurping pretenders. While unsuccessful in 1842, the dynasty would eventually regain the throne in 1997 with the ascension of Emperor Jason VI Augustus. At his ascension, there was speculation as to whether he would assume the regnal name "Jason VI" in following the Senatorial supported line or "Jason XI" to support the Claudii-legitimist line. Under the legitimist line interpretation, Emperor Constantine XX would utilize the regnal name of "Constantine XXI".

The current descendant of this line is Emperor Constantine XX of Latium. The line of succession is as follows:

  1. Peter I of Adrianople, son of Empress Maria I Augusta (1027–1099)
  2. Constantine I of Adrianople, son of Peter I (1065–1115)
  3. Michael I of Adrianople, son of Constantine I (1094–1132)
  4. Leo I of Adrianople, son of Michael I (1113–1151)
  5. Jason I of Adrianople, son of Leo I (1131–1194)
  6. Constantine II of Adrianople, grandson of Jason I (1184–1229)
  7. Leo II of Adrianople, son of Constantine II (1200–1240)
  8. Alexius I of Adrianople, uncle of Leo II (1186–1255)
  9. Alexius II of Adrianople, son of Alexius I (1219–1267)
  10. Constantine III of Adrianople, grandson of Alexius II (1254–1311)
  11. Jason II of Adrianople, son of Constantine III (1286–1335)
  12. Michael II of Adrianople, son of Jason II (1312–1361)
  13. Marcus I of Adrianople, son of Michael III (1330–1400)
  14. John I of Adrianople, nephew of Marcus I (1370–1419)
  15. Constantine IV of Adrianople, son of John I (1395–1448)
  16. Peter II, Duke of Adrianople, son of Constantine IV (1421–1471)
  17. Leo III, Duke of Adrianople, son of Peter II (1442–1483)
  18. Marcus II, Duke of Adrianople, son of Leo III (1475–1534)
  19. Jason III, Duke of Adrianople, son of Marcus II (1500–1560)
  20. Maria I, Duchess of Adrianople, daughter of Jason (1525–1560)
  21. John II, Duke of Adrianople, son of Maria I (1546–1610)
  22. Philip I, Duke of Adrianople, son of John II (1564–1629)
  23. Michael III, Duke of Adrianople, son of Philip I (1590–1665)
  24. Philip II, Duke of Adrianople, grandson of Michael III (1640–1675)
  25. Constantine V, Duke of Adrianople, son of Philip II (1666–1678)
  26. Leo IV, Duke of Adrianople , uncle of Constantine V (1650–1705)
  27. John III, Duke of Adrianople, son of Leo IV (1680–1731)
  28. Constantine VI, Duke of Adrianople, son of John VI (1708–1770)
  29. Theodosius I, Duke of Adrianople, son of Constantine VI (1730–1775)
  30. Jason IV, Duke of Adrianople, son of Jason (1754–1782)
  31. Leo V, Duke of Adrianople, son of Jason IV (1777–1830)
  32. Isidorus I, Duke of Adrianople, son of Leo V (1800–1871)
  33. Peter III, Duke of Adrianople, son of Isidorus I (1826–1896)
  34. Philip III, Duke of Adrianople, son of Peter III (1845–1910)
  35. Theodosius II, Duke of Adrianople, son of Philip III (1867–1930)
  36. Jason V, Duke of Adrianople, son of Theodosius I (1900-1976)
  37. Leo VI, Duke of Adrianople, son of Jason V (1929–1997)
  38. Jason VI Augustus of Latium, son of Leo VI (1960–2016)
  39. Constantine XX of Latium, son of Jason (b. 1994)

Heir apparent: Alexius, Prince of Youth (b. 2019).

Descendants of Constantia of Latium

This line's claim to the throne is based on the belief that Princess Constantia of Latium, the future Empress of Ghant, was the lawful successor of Emperor Michael III and not Andreas Anicius, whom was selected by the Great Council of 1842. Before the Great Council, a group of Senators reportedly offered the throne to then Crown Prince Nathan of Ghant, however he refused and instructed the group of Senators to instead offer the throne to his younger brother Prince Leo of Ghant. News of this reportedly outraged a number of Senators, who believed it illegal that a foreign-raised protestant be placed on the Latin throne and demanded the Consuls of that year, Duke Constantine Anicius and Alexander Voconius, to call for a Grand Council to determine the proper heir. The Gentry line of Leo of Ghant was ultimately passed over in favor of Anicius's eldest son, Andreas Anicius, the first cousin of Emperor Michael III and the closet male heir.

The current descendant of this line is Peter II, King of Keld. The line of succession is as follows:

  1. Leo II, King of Keld, (1824–1885) second son of Constantia
  2. Leo III, King of Keld, son of Leo II (1843-1896)
  3. John VIII, King of Keld, son of Leo III (1865–1945)
  4. Constantine V, King of Keld, son of John VIII (1886–1960)
  5. Prince John of Keld, son of Paul I (1910–1945)
  6. Peter I, King of Keld, son of name (1930–1994)
  7. John IX, King of Keld, son of Peter I (1951–1997)
  8. Peter II, King of Keld, son of John IX (b. 1972)

Heir apparent: Paul, Crown Prince of Keld (b. 1993).

Prince Paul's heir presumptive is Prince Robert of Keld (b. 2018), his eldest son.

See also