Gylian þaler

Gylian þaler
Þaler
ISO 4217
CodeGTH
Denominations
SymbolŦ
Banknotes
 Freq. usedŦ1.000, Ŧ5.000, Ŧ10.000, Ŧ50.000, Ŧ100.000, Ŧ500.000, Ŧ1.000.000, Ŧ5.000.000, Ŧ10.000.000, Ŧ50.000.000
Coins
 Freq. usedŦ1, Ŧ5, Ŧ10, Ŧ50, Ŧ100, Ŧ500
Demographics
Date of introduction1958
User(s) Gylias
Issuance
Central bankNational Bank of Gylias
Valuation
InflationN/A
Pegged withCommon Monetary System

The þaler (symbol: Ŧ; code: GTH) is the federal currency of Gylias. It is issued by the National Bank of Gylias.

It was introduced in 1958, as a successor of the zauþar scrip system of the late Free Territories. Its international value is low but stable, and it has never undergone redenomination or revaluation.

The þaler has distinctive traits among Tyranian currencies. It coexists with numerous complementary currencies, which are pegged to it at a value of 1:1. Money creation is under public control and carried out by the National Bank of Gylias, creating a full-reserve banking system.

It is part of Common Monetary System, and its value is pegged within a currency band with other Common Sphere currencies.

Etymology

The currency's name is derived from the German thaler.

History

In the second phase of the Liberation War, Aliska Géza took the initiative of creating the zauþar scrip system. This served as a common unit of reference for the existing monetary and non-monetary systems of the Free Territories.

Following the end of the war, the zauþar became the þaler during the transition from the Free Territories to Gylias. After an initial burst of inflation during the trial-and-error phase of the National Prices Board, its value stabilised. Gylias joined the Common Sphere soon after independence, and the þaler became part of the Common Monetary System.

The þaler remains one of Tyran's least valued currencies, with an exchange rate generally in the range of Ŧ700 to Ŧ1000 for 1 NSD. No redenomination of the currency has ever been undertaken. Frequently cited factors for this include the disruption of the NPB's activity and records, and encouraging numeracy by accustoming the population to working with large numbers from an early age.

Coins

The coins of the þaler have a functional and austere design, lacking in decoration. They do not feature portraits in order to be representative of all Gylians.

Current þaler coin series
Image Value Technical parameters Description
Diameter Mass Composition Edge Obverse Reverse
Ŧ1 20 mm 1 g Aluminium Smooth Olive leaves, seal, year of minting Value
Ŧ5 22 mm 2 g Copper-plated steel Smooth Olive leaves, seal, year of minting Value
Ŧ10 24 mm 3 g Copper and tin Smooth Olive leaves, seal, year of minting Value
Ŧ50 26 mm 4 g Brass-plated steel Smooth Olive leaves, seal, year of minting Value
Ŧ100 28 mm 5 g Cupronickel Reeded Olive leaves, seal, year of minting Value
Ŧ500 30 mm 6 g Nickel brass Reeded Olive leaves, seal, year of minting Value

Banknotes

The banknotes of the þaler have a functional and austere design. They do not feature portraits in order to be representative of all Gylians.

Image Value Dimensions
(millimetres)
Main colour Description
Obverse Reverse Obverse Reverse
Ŧ1.000 120 × 61 mm Grey Value, seal, map of Gylias Value, mountain landscape
Ŧ5.000 125 × 64 mm Violet Value, seal, map of Gylias Value, field of flowers
Ŧ10.000 130 × 67 mm Blue Value, seal, map of Gylias Value, river, Morpho peleides
Ŧ50.000 135 × 70 mm Cyan Value, seal, map of Gylias Value, sea landscape
Ŧ100.000 140 × 73 mm Dark green Value, seal, map of Gylias Value, rainforest
Ŧ500.000 145 × 76 mm Light green Value, seal, map of Gylias Value, violin outline, musical notes
Ŧ1.000.000 150 × 80 mm Yellow Value, seal, map of Gylias Value, field with a windmill
Ŧ5.000.000 155 × 82 mm Gold Value, seal, map of Gylias Value, pen in inkwell and paper
Ŧ10.000.000 160 × 84 mm Red Value, seal, map of Gylias Value, ancient academy and orrery
Ŧ50.000.000 165 × 85 mm Platinum Value, seal, map of Gylias Value, sailing ships and astrolabe

Complementary currencies

The þaler coexists with numerous complementary currencies. These include:

Complementary currencies circulate at legal parity with the þaler. While the þaler is controlled by the National Bank, complementary currencies are controlled by communities, local governments, and others. They are traded through local exchange trading systems and online community exchange systems.