This article belongs to the lore of Esquarium.

LGBT rights in Esquarium

The countries in Esquarium overall have a relatively progressive attitude to LGBT rights, with some notable exceptions.

Country Right to practice same-sex activity Right to freedom of expression Right to serve in military Legal protection against discrimination Legal recognition of same-sex relations Right to adoption Right to change gender
 Ainin Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Never criminalised Never criminalised Since 1987 Since 1988 Since 1968 Since 2000 Since 2005
 Ambrose Yes Yes Partial Yes No No No
Since 1986 Since 1986 Since 1990, Don't Ask Don't Tell policy in place Public sector anti-discrimination laws in place, however none specifically for LGBT Never legalized Never legalized Never legalized
 Katranjiev Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Partial
Since 1937 Since 1937 Since 1953 Since 1937 Civil unions from 1954 to 1996, legalized in 1996 Since 1968 Since 2003, surgery required
 Luziyca Yes Yes Yes Partial Yes Yes Partial
Legal nation-wide since 1994 Legal nation-wide since 1994 Since 1991, under a Don't Ask, Don't Tell Policy, fully legal since 2017 Only for the public sector since 1994 Marriage since 1994
Civil partnerships from 1974 to 1994
Since 1994 Varies by state
 Montecara Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Since 1870 Never banned Never banned Since 1983 Marriage since 2010 Since 1998 Never banned; surgery covered under public health plan since 2012
 Namor Yes Yes Yes Yes Partial Yes No
De jure legal since 1950
Fully legal in 1980
De jure legal since 1950
Fully legal in 1980
Since 1990 Since 1990 Civil unions since 1990 Since 1997 Never legalized
 Tuthina Yes Yes Yes Yes Partial Yes No
Never criminalised Never criminalised Never criminalised Never criminalised Same-sex relations are limited to concubinage.[1] Never criminalised Physiological modification of sex organs for non-medical reason are illegal in the Empire. There are no country-wide consensus on recognition of sex reassignment surgery conducted outside the country.
 Xiaodong Yes Yes No No No No Partial
Legalised in the 1958 Criminal Code. Guaranteed by constitutional amendments in 1996. Never Legalised. Never Legalised. Never Legalised. Never Legalised. Legalised only with reassignment surgery in 2004.

Notes

  1. In Tuthinan society, five gender identities are traditionally recognised: masculine male, masculine female, intersex, feminine male, and feminine female. Traditional view holds that full marriage is only applicable between masculine male and feminine female, or masculine female and feminine male. However, it has often been interpreted to allow marriage between any of the five genders except its own.